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Shum, Gary Tse-Hong (Aug 23, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (the “College”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Gary Tse-Hong Shum (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183.

    The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the Health Professions Act.

  2. Effective date: August 23, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Gary Tse-Hong Shum

  4. Location of Practice: Vancouver, BC

  5. The College’s Investigation:

    Multiple registrants were involved in this matter.

    The College’s investigation found that between January 2012 and June 2018, over 20,000 false transactions were processed on patient PharmaNet records at two pharmacies, where the Registrant had worked as a pharmacist at one of the pharmacies. These transactions were considered false because:

    • Schedule I (prescription) medications associated with these transactions had not been authorized or prescribed by the prescriber associated with each transaction;
    • Medications associated with these transactions, which included Schedule I, Over-The-Counter (“OTC) medications and vitamins, were not actually dispensed to the “patient” in each case;
    • Transactions were processed as one-day supplies or seven-day supplies, for the sole purpose of artificially inflating prescription counts; and
    • Transactions were processed not for the purpose of providing health care and were not processed with each patient’s voluntary consent.
       

    The College’s investigation also found that during the same time period, over 10,000 transactions were processed on patient PharmaNet records for medications that were actually authorized but processed as one-day supplies or seven-day supplies when there was no clinical indication to do so. The medications for these transactions were not actually dispensed to the patient on a daily or weekly basis, making each patient’s PharmaNet records inaccurate and not current. These transactions were processed in this manner for the sole purpose of artificially inflating prescription counts.

    The “patients” whose PharmaNet records were affected were all either current or former employees of the two pharmacies, or family members of former employees of the two pharmacies. Reportedly, the owner of the two pharmacies had directed for transactions to be processed in the above manner in order to artificially inflate prescription counts at both pharmacies.

  6. The Registrant's involvement and acknowledgments:

    Regarding the Registrant’s involvement in this matter, the Inquiry Committee considered it substantiated, and the Registrant has acknowledged, that:

    1. He processed false transactions for Schedule I and OTC/vitamin medications on his own PharmaNet record and on the PharmaNet records of his colleagues;

    2. He processed one-day supply transactions for Schedule I and OTC/vitamin medications on the PharmaNet records of his colleague’s family members, where these medications were not actually dispensed to the patient on a daily basis, making the patient’s PharmaNet records inaccurate and not current; were all processed as one-day supplies for the sole purpose of artificially inflating prescription counts; and were not clinically indicated to be dispensed on a daily basis;

    3. He backdated PharmaNet transactions, meaning that the transaction records were created on a date later than the date that appears on PharmaNet;

    4. He billed the false and inaccurate transactions described above to PharmaCare and/or third-party insurance plans, when he knew these to be false or misleading claims;

    5. He processed medications on PharmaNet for himself;

    6. He inappropriately used personal health information and created inaccurate PharmaNet records, placing himself, his family members, his colleagues, and his colleagues’ family members at risk of harm, in case their PharmaNet records ever needed to be accessed for legitimate medical reasons; and

    7. He failed to report to the College or to another person of authority regarding the improper practices occurring at the pharmacy, even though he knew that these practices were improper.

  7. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the College’s Inquiry Committee, wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part):

    1. To successfully complete and pass an ethics course for healthcare professionals within two years. If he fails to complete this within the specified time period, his registration will be suspended for a period of 60 days;

    2. To appear before the Inquiry Committee for a verbal reprimand;
       
    3. To have a letter of reprimand placed permanently on the College register;
       
    4. To not be a pharmacy manager and/or a preceptor for pharmacy students for a period of 180 days from August 23, 2020 to February 19, 2021;

    5. To pay a $1000.00 fine;

    6. To successfully pass the College’s Jurisprudence Exam; and

    7. To successfully complete and pass the “BC Community Pharmacy Manager Training Program” offered by the British Columbia Pharmacy Association.

  8. Rationale:

    The Registrant’s actions were considered serious contraventions of legislation involving pharmacy practice standards and the appropriate access, use and protection of personal health information and PharmaNet records. His misconduct placed himself and others at risk of harm. The Registrant also contravened standards of the Code of Ethics involving protecting and promoting the well-being of patients, benefitting society, committing to personal and professional integrity, participating in ethical business practices, and conflicts of interest.

    In determining an appropriate disposition for the Registrant, the Inquiry Committee considered the Registrant’s report of feeling pressured by his employer (the pharmacy owner) to commit these actions, and that he personally did not stand to gain financially from what occurred.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession. Inappropriate access and use of personal health information compromises the public’s trust in the pharmacy profession as a whole. At all times, registrants must uphold legislative requirements and ethical obligations to appropriately access, use and protect personal health information.

Nwaogwugwu, Chidi Nweze (Aug 21, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (the “College”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Chidi Nweze Nwaogwugwu (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183.

    The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the Health Professions Act.

  2. Effective date: August 21, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Chidi Nweze Nwaogwugwu

  4. Location of Practice: North Vancouver, BC

  5. The College’s Investigation:

    Multiple registrants were involved in this matter.

    The College’s investigation found that between January 2012 and June 2018, over 20,000 false transactions were processed on patient PharmaNet records at two pharmacies, where the Registrant had worked as a pharmacist at one of the pharmacies. These transactions were considered false because:

    • Schedule I (prescription) medications associated with these transactions had not been authorized or prescribed by the prescriber associated with each transaction;
    • Medications associated with these transactions, which included Schedule I, Over-The-Counter (“OTC) medications and vitamins, were not actually dispensed to the “patient” in each case;
    • Transactions were processed as one-day supplies or seven-day supplies, for the sole purpose of artificially inflating prescription counts; and
    • Transactions were processed not for the purpose of providing health care and were not processed with each patient’s voluntary consent.
       

    The College’s investigation also found that during the same time period, over 10,000 transactions were processed on patient PharmaNet records for medications that were actually authorized but processed as one-day supplies or seven-day supplies when there was no clinical indication to do so. The medications for these transactions were not actually dispensed to the patient on a daily or weekly basis, making each patient’s PharmaNet records inaccurate and not current. These transactions were processed in this manner for the sole purpose of artificially inflating prescription counts.

    The “patients” whose PharmaNet records were affected were all either current or former employees of the two pharmacies, or family members of former employees of the two pharmacies. Reportedly, the owner of the two pharmacies had directed for transactions to be processed in the above manner in order to artificially inflate prescription counts at both pharmacies.

  6. The Registrant's involvement and acknowledgments:

    Regarding the Registrant’s involvement in this matter, the Inquiry Committee considered it substantiated, and the Registrant has acknowledged, that:

    1. On three separate occasions, on the PharmaNet records of three of his colleagues, his name was associated with false PharmaNet transactions for vitamins;

    2. He backdated the majority of these PharmaNet transactions, meaning that the transaction records were created on a date later than the date that appears on PharmaNet;

    3. He inappropriately used personal health information and created inaccurate PharmaNet records, placing his colleagues at risk of harm, in case their PharmaNet records ever needed to be accessed for legitimate medical reasons; and

    4. He failed to report to the College or to another person of authority regarding the improper practices occurring at the pharmacy, even though he knew that these practices were improper.

  7. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the College’s Inquiry Committee, wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part):

    1. To successfully complete and pass an ethics course for healthcare professionals within two years. If he fails to complete this within the specified time period, his registration will be suspended for a period of 60 days;

    2. To appear before the Inquiry Committee for a verbal reprimand;
       
    3. To have a letter of reprimand placed permanently on the College register;
       
    4. To not be a preceptor for pharmacy students for a period of 180 days from August 21, 2020 to February 17, 2021;

    5. To pay a $1000.00 fine;

    6. To successfully pass the College’s Jurisprudence Exam; and

    7. To successfully complete and pass the “BC Community Pharmacy Manager Training Program” offered by the British Columbia Pharmacy Association.

  8. Rationale:

    The Registrant’s actions were considered serious contraventions of legislation involving pharmacy practice standards and the appropriate access, use and protection of personal health information and PharmaNet records. His misconduct placed others at risk of harm. The Registrant also contravened standards of the Code of Ethics involving protecting and promoting the well-being of patients, benefitting society, committing to personal and professional integrity, and participating in ethical business practices.

    In determining an appropriate disposition for the Registrant, the Inquiry Committee considered the Registrant’s report of feeling pressured by his employer (the pharmacy owner) to commit these actions, and that he personally did not stand to gain financially from what occurred.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession. Inappropriate access and use of personal health information compromises the public’s trust in the pharmacy profession as a whole. At all times, registrants must uphold legislative requirements and ethical obligations to appropriately access, use and protect personal health information.

Lee, Billy (Jul 8, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: ​The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (“CPBC”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Billy Lee (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996 c. 183. The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the Health Professions Act.

  2. Effective date: July 8, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Billy Lee

  4. Location of Practice: Richmond, BC

  5. Admissions and Acknowledgements:

    The Registrant has admitted and/or acknowledged the following: 

    1. While he was a pharmacist registrant, he was involved with a company known as Quantum Solutions, SRL that sold wholesale quantities of Schedule 1 prescription drugs to pharmacies located in the United States over a period of four years between 2007 and 2011. This conduct was investigated by the United States Attorney’s Office in the Western District of Pennsylvania which resulted in criminal charges being filed against the Registrant and others. The Registrant entered a guilty plea to the charges and was sentenced to pay fines and to three years’ probation commencing July 31, 2018 and ending on July 31, 2021.

    2. The Registrant has acknowledged to CPBC that his involvement with Quantum was a contravention the following legislation (as the legislation existed between 2007 and 2011):

      1. Section 9 of the Pharmacy Operations and Drug Schedule Act, S.B.C. 2003, c. 77 (“PODSA”) (which was prior to April 1, 2009 section 29 of the Pharmacists, Pharmacy Operations and Drug Scheduling Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 363);

      2. Which was then Section 3(5) of Bylaws to PODSA (which was prior to April 1, 2009 section 31(5) of the Bylaws of the Council of the College of Pharmacists of BC (“Council Bylaws”));

      3. Which was then section 90(1)(d) of the Council Bylaws; and

      4. Which was then Value I of the Code of Ethics.

  6. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the Inquiry Committee wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part):

    1. To not repeat the conduct to which this matter relates;

    2. To successfully complete and pass an ethics course for healthcare professionals;
       
    3. To have a letter of reprimand placed on the College register for a period of five years;
       
    4. To be suspended as a registrant of the College for a period of 90 consecutive days, commencing July 8, 2020; and

    5. To not act as a pharmacy manager, direct or indirect owner of a pharmacy, and preceptor for a period of 180 days from the date that his suspension ends.

  7. Rationale:

    The Inquiry Committee considered that in this case, the misconduct of the Registrant was of a serious nature and that the Registrant should have known that his conduct was unbecoming of a pharmacist.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the totality of the Registrant’s conduct and considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession.

Pharmacist Registrant 44 (Jul 7, 2020)

The Inquiry Committee, pursuant to section 32.3(3)(b)(ii) of the Health Professions Act, has reached an Agreement with the pharmacist registrant to voluntarily suspend their registration as a pharmacist effective July 7, 2020. The Agreement remains in effect until further notice. The Inquiry Committee considers the Agreement necessary to protect the public. The pharmacist registrant’s name has been withheld pursuant to section 39.3(4)(a) of the Health Professions Act.

Pharmacist Registrant 43 (Jun 16, 2020)

The Inquiry Committee has reinstated pharmacist registrant’s registration, which had previously been suspended for an indefinite period on April 8, 2020. The pharmacist registrant’s name has been withheld pursuant to section 39.3(4) of the Health Professions Act. 


April 8, 2020
(June 12, 2020 - Registration Reinstated)

The Inquiry Committee, pursuant to s. 32.3(3)(b)(ii) of the Health Professions Act, has reached an Agreement with the pharmacist registrant to voluntarily suspend the registration as a pharmacist effective April 8, 2020. The Agreement remains in effect until further notice. The Inquiry Committee considers the Agreement necessary to protect the public. The pharmacist registrant's name has been withheld pursuant to section 39.3(4)(a) of the Health Professions Act.

Sam, William Byron (Jun 15, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: ​The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (“CPBC”) conducted investigations into the practice of William Byron Sam (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183 (“HPA”).

    The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigations by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the HPA.

  2. Effective date: June 15, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: William Byron Sam

  4. Location of Practice: Vancouver, BC

  5. Admissions and Acknowledgements:

    The Registrant has admitted and/or acknowledged the following: 

    1. The Registrant failed to respond in to correspondence from the College, including requests for information from College staff.

    2. The Registrant continued to engage in the practice of pharmacy at a time when his registration was cancelled contrary to s. 3 of the Pharmacists Regulation.

    3. The Registrant operated or permitted the operation of a pharmacy when not authorized under bylaw or by a pharmacy licence contrary to section 7(1) and (3) of the Pharmacy Operations and Drug Scheduling Act (“PODSA”).

    4. The Registrant sold and dispensed drugs to patients without having the correct information for the pharmacy on the label, contrary to section 9 of PODSA and section 9 of the Community Pharmacy Standards of Practice which are Part 1 of Schedule F to the HPA Bylaws. 

  6. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the Inquiry Committee wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part):

    1. cancellation of his registration,

    2. no right to apply for reinstatement for 3 years, and
       
    3. before submitting an application for reinstatement after 3 years, he must

      • pay a fine of $25,000, and
      • at his own expense, successfully complete all of
        • the College’s Jurisprudence Examination,
        • the Canadian Pharmacy Practice Program (CP3), and
        • the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada, Pharmacist Qualifying Examination – Part II (OSCE);

       

  7. Rationale:

    There were previous issues with the Registrant regarding unresponsiveness to and disregard for the College and its regulatory requirements and its communications with him.

    The Registrant knowingly engaged in the practice of pharmacy at a time when he was not registered to do so.  He also knowingly operating an unlicensed pharmacy, contrary to the directions of the College.  Serious public risk factors were present within the pharmacy.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession.


June 6, 2019
(June 15, 2020 - Registration Cancelled)

Pursuant to section 35(1)(b) of the Health Professions Act, the Inquiry Committee has ordered a suspension of the registration of registrant William Byron Sam pending completion of an investigation, effective June 6, 2019. The Registrant will not be able to practice pharmacy in the province of British Columbia while his registration is suspended. The Inquiry Committee considered the suspension necessary to protect the public.

The Inquiry Committee was satisfied on the information before it that there is a real risk to the public should this interim order not be put in place. The Registrant was knowingly operating an unlicensed pharmacy, contrary to the directions of the College. Serious public risk indicators were present within the pharmacy. The Registrant continued to display an inexplicable pattern of responsiveness to and disregard for the College and its regulatory requirements and its communications with him.

Note: Suspensions ordered by the Inquiry Committee under section 35(1)(b) of the Health Professions Act are made to protect the public during an investigation or pending a hearing of the Discipline Committee. Orders made under this section relate to matters which are and remain unproven unless admitted by a registrant or determined by the Discipline Committee.

Sharma, Shiv Kumar (Apr 15, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: ​The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacist of British Columbia (the “College”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Shiv Kumar Sharma (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(1) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183. The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the Health Professions Act.

  2. Effective date: April 15, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Shiv Kumar Sharma

  4. Location of Practice: Surrey, BC

  5. Admissions and Acknowledgements: The Registrant has admitted and/or acknowledged the following: 

    1. While he was director and pharmacy manager, pharmacy staff (including himself) altered PharmaNet entries for a patient creating an inaccurate patient record. Additionally, pharmacy staff (including himself) backdated the patient's prescriptions, meaning that the dispensing records for those prescriptions were created on dates later than the dates on which the drugs in question were actually dispensed, contrary to section 35(1) of the Bylaws to the Pharmacy Operations and Drug Scheduling Act; and

    2. The Registrant did not provide truthful or accurate information to the Investigator during the investigation into the matter, contrary to section 19 of the Bylaws to the Pharmacy Operations and Drug Scheduling Act

  6. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the Inquiry Committee of CPBC, wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part):

    1. To not be a pharmacy manager for a period of twenty-eight (28) days from April 17, 2020 to May 14, 2020;

    2. To not be a preceptor or supervisor of pharmacy students and/or international pharmacy graduates for a period of one year from April 15, 2020 to April 14, 2021;
       
    3. To pay a $1000.00 fine;

    4. To successfully pass the CPBC's Jurisprudence Exam; and

    5. To successfully complete and pass an ethics course designed specifically for health care professionals pass an ethics course for healthcare professionals;​

  7. Rationale:

    The Inquiry Committee considered that in this case, in addition to the serious misconduct, the Registrant placed his patient at significant risk of harm when he altered the patient’s PharmaNet record. His actions were a serious contravention of the standards in the Code of Ethics, and compromised the public’s trust in the pharmacy profession as a whole.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the totality of the Registrant’s conduct to be serious, and that he required remediation and a deterrence in order to come into compliance. The Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession. 

Deol, Harpreet Singh (Feb 5, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: ​The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacist of British Columbia (the “College”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Harpreet Deol (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183. The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the Health Professions Act.

  2. Effective date: February 5, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Harpreet Singh Deol​

  4. Location of Practice: Abbotsford, BC

  5. Admissions and Acknowledgements:

    Between February 2018 and August 2019, the Registrant took unauthorized medications for his own personal use from the pharmacy for which he was director and pharmacy manager. The medications taken included, but were not limited to, 11,000 tablets and 116,000 millilitres of narcotic drug substances and 200 tablets and 7 vials of controlled drug substances, both of which require an authorized prescription.

    The Registrant did not process or bill these medications on PharmaNet and these medications were reportedly not provided to any other persons. All narcotic and controlled drug inventory was ordered and managed under the Registrant’s credentials and may have contributed to these losses going undetected.

    A College inspection conducted on August 7th, 2019 identified additional deficiencies in the Registrant’s management of the pharmacy and the pharmacy’s overall practice which included, but were not limited to, inaccurate dispensing of Methadone, inadequate/incomplete documentation, a lack of policies and procedures, inadequate record keeping and management of narcotic inventory, and inadequate pharmacy security

  6. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the College’s Inquiry Committee, wherein the Registrant consented to terms that include (but are not limited to) the following:

    1. To suspend his registration as a pharmacist for a total of 90 days, ending September 9, 2020;

    2. To not be pharmacy manager, director, or officer of a pharmacy for a period of three years from September 10, 2020 to September 9, 2023;
       
    3. To not be a preceptor or supervisor of pharmacy students or international pharmacy graduates for a period of three years from September 10, 2020 to September 9, 2023;

    4. In relation to narcotic and controlled drugs, to not place and receive orders, destroy expired inventory, or have signing authority relating to the ordering of such substances for a period of three years from September 10, 2020 to September 9, 2023;

    5. To complete and successfully pass an ethics course for healthcare professionals;

    6. To complete and successfully pass training courses pertaining to the provision of Opioid Agonist Treatment (OAT) to patients and the management of a community pharmacy; and

    7. To pay a fine of $2,500.

  7. Rationale:

    The Inquiry Committee considered that in this case, in addition to the serious misconduct, the Registrant placed himself and his patients at significant risk of harm when he took unauthorized medications for personal use and continued to practice in the capacity of a pharmacist. His actions were a serious contravention of standards in the Code of Ethics, and compromised the public’s trust in the pharmacy profession as a whole.

    The Inquiry Committee therefore determined that the Registrant required serious remediation and deterrence regarding his conduct. After also considering significant mitigating factors, the Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement appropriate to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession.

Bao, Leanne Hong Le (Jan 31, 2020)
  1. Nature of Action: ​The Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (“CPBC”) conducted an investigation into the practice of Leanne Hong Le Bao (the “Registrant”), pursuant to section 33(4) of the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183 (“HPA”).

    The Inquiry Committee and the Registrant have agreed to resolve all matters arising from the investigation by way of a Consent Agreement under section 36(1) of the HPA.

  2. Effective date: January 31, 2020

  3. Name of registrant: Leanne Hong Le Bao

  4. Location of Practice: Vancouver, BC

  5. Admissions and Acknowledgements:

    The Registrant has admitted and/or acknowledged the following (in part):

    1. The Registrant was in breach of her previous consented undertakings, which can be considered professional misconduct under section 26 of the HPA;
       
    2. The Registrant did not process methadone prescriptions on PharmaNet prior to dispensing on at least 25 occasions, contrary to section 21(1) now section 35(1) of the Pharmacy Operations and Drug Scheduling Act (“PODSA”), Bylaws;

    3. The Registrant did not ensure appropriate documentation and record keeping relating to Methadone Maintenance Treatment practices, contrary to principle 4.1.3 and 2.1.2 of Professional Practice Policy – 66;

    4. As pharmacy manager, the Registrant did not ensure that the pharmacy’s premise was suitable for operation, contrary to section 2(1)(b)(iv) of PODSA prior to April 1, 2018, section 11(2)(c)(d) now section 25(2)(c)(d) of the PODSA, Bylaws and section 8(a) of the Food and Drugs Act
       
  6. Disposition:

    The Registrant entered into a Consent Agreement with the Inquiry Committee of CPBC, wherein the Registrant consented to the following terms (in part): 

    1. To not be a pharmacy manager until:

      • She has completed Jurisprudence Exam;
      • She has completed “The BC Community Pharmacy Manager Training Program” offered by the British Columbia Pharmacy Association; and
      • She has met with the Deputy Registrar to reflect on her conduct and how she will improve her pharmacy practice going forward.
         
    2. To acknowledge a CPBC follow-up inspection may be conducted within a year; and
       
    3. To pay a $5,000.00 fine.​

  7. Rationale:

    The Registrant consented to undertakings in relation to a previous file. The undertakings in the previous file included the College conducting a follow-up inspection. Upon re-inspection, College investigators observed similar deficiencies, including narcotic counts and reconciliations were not completed, Methadone Maintenance Treatment documentation and record keeping were not appropriately completed, and the Pharmacy premise was not suitable for dispensing. Based on this, the Inquiry Committee determined the Registrant’s practice did not comply with the legislated practice standards and that the Registrant was in breach of her previous Consent Agreement, which can be considered as professional misconduct. The Inquiry Committee considered the Registrant’s conduct to be serious and that the Registrant required remediation and a deterrence in order for her practice to come into compliance.

    The Inquiry Committee considered the terms of the Consent Agreement necessary to protect the public, as well as send a clear message of deterrence to the profession. 

Wiebe, Shaun Ross (Dec 27, 2019)

Nature of Action: Pursuant to section 35(1)(b) of the Health Professions Act R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183 (“HPA”), the Inquiry Committee of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia (the “College”) has ordered a suspension of the registration of registrant Shaun Ross Wiebe pending completion of an investigation, unless he provides medical evidence from an addiction medicine specialist, satisfactory to the College, that he is fit to resume practice, or he successfully applies to the Inquiry Committee to cancel the suspension under section 35(4) of the HPA.

The registrant will not be able to practice pharmacy in the province of British Columbia while his registration is suspended.

Effective Date: December 27, 2019

Reasons: The Inquiry Committee was satisfied that there is a prima facie evidence that the registrant suffers from a substance addiction that renders him unfit to practice at this time. The Inquiry Committee was of the view that the registrant’s continued practice poses a risk to the public, and that this risk cannot be addressed at this time with conditions or limits. Therefore, nothing short of suspension at this time will adequately protect the public. 

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